Posts Tagged ‘cfre’

Fully Engaged

September 5, 2013
Nora Gunn, CFRE

Nora Gunn, CFRE

Diana Nyad has made history this week as the first person to swim the 110-mile Florida Strait. This was Nyad’s fifth attempt, and it took her 53 hours to complete. Nyad, 64, said that her record-setting swim was about being “fully engaged” in life – a lesson in passion and persistence we all can take to heart. Here in the AFP Suncoast Chapter, we have several opportunities for our members and the community-at-large to become fully engaged in philanthropy.

Our keynote speaker on September 17 will be fundraising veteran and long-standing AFP member, Holly Duncan. She will be sharing a career’s worth of advice and anecdotes on her professional development experience. It’s a not-to-be missed program.

On September 20, nominations are due for our 28th Annual National Philanthropy Day celebration. This is a great way for your charity to honor donors and volunteers whose gifts of time, expertise and resources contribute significantly to the quality of life in our communities. The National Philanthropy Day committee, chaired by Bryn Warner, has been working hard to ensure this will be the best celebration to date. Please consider submitting one or more nominations on behalf of your organization.

This month, the Resource Development committee led by Judy Anderson will launch a philanthropic guide that highlights some of the most visible and valuable marketing opportunities for partners to support of the development profession.  Partners interested in sponsoring chapter activities should contact us as soon as possible as spots are filling up fast.

We will soon be electing a new slate of officers that will lead our organization in the years to come. I encourage you to speak with a member of our nominating committee if you have interest in serving in a leadership capacity or on a committee of the Board.

Diana Nyad’s goal took a team of experts that helped her make the swim from Cuba to Key West, giving her nourishment, protecting her from jellyfish and monitoring her health. For our volunteer-run Chapter to succeed and accomplish its goal of promoting ethical and effective fundraising, it takes the work of many members and professionals behind-the-scenes and along the way. Thank you to our members and leaders who are fully engaged with our mission, and welcome to those that would like to be.

Nora Gunn, CFRE
2013 AFP Suncoast President
Vice President, St. Joseph’s Hospital Foundation & St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital Foundation
Phone: 813 872 0979

How Good Ideas Spread

August 1, 2013
Nora Gunn, CFRE

Nora Gunn, CFRE

I recently read an article by Atul Gawande called “Slow Ideas.” Among his many accomplishments, Gawande is a professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School and has been named one of the hundred most influential thinkers by Time. He asks a question that many in the field of philanthropy have wondered, “How do good ideas spread?”

The basis of his medical research suggests that we yearn for frictionless, technological solutions, but that people talking to people is still the way to make change happen. The concept struck me as something that is so easily relatable to what we do in the Development profession. How we engage a donor with our not-for-profit, how a donor becomes passionate about our mission, how we inspire them to make a gift.

Gawande uses a series of historical medical advances and current third-world problems to illustrate a pattern of important, but stalled, ideas and movements. While his research work currently focuses on systems innovations in surgery globally, he emphasizes a very important point: we are in the first part of the twenty-first century, and we are still trying to figure out how to get ideas from the first part of the twentieth century to take root. Just like each of us in our not-for-profits, these change agents have been tackling problems that are big, but somewhat invisible to the greater majority of society. Drawing attention to our cause can be challenging in a distracted and fragmented world. 

In the era of social media, we’ve become enamored with ideas that spread contagiously. We connect with donors via email blasts; we post our latest giving opportunities on Facebook; we create YouTube videos about our programs. Gawande contends that technology is not enough to motivate action.

Mass media can introduce a new idea to people. But, change is a social process. To truly adopt a new idea (in our case, support to a cause) people follow the lead of other people they know and trust when they make decisions. To create new giving behaviors, we have to understand people’s existing norms, objections and motivations. We have to talk to them. The mere value of an opportunity is not enough. Human interaction is the key force in overcoming resistance and speeding change.

In Gawande’s research, he evaluated many common change approaches like group instruction, penalties and incentives. In our work, group instruction could be akin to public service announcements for our charity, penalties likened to more tax burden without philanthropy, and incentives equated to the donor benefits provided by our organization as recognition. What is interesting, and somewhat inherent, is that research has found the most successful approach to be when people are given mentors. In fundraising, we give our donors this kind of attention through our board members and leadership volunteers, and by when we sit down face-to-face and build relationships. It comes down to some basic elements of donor engagement: through personal outreach, they will come to know you; if they know you, they might trust you; and, if they trust you, that’s when they are motivated to change.

Want to read Atul Gawande’s full article? Click here.

Nora Gunn, CFRE
2013 AFP Suncoast President
Vice President, St. Joseph’s Hospital Foundation & St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital Foundation
Phone: 813 872 0979

Ten Stars and Lots of Friends

March 7, 2013
Nora Gunn, CFRE

Nora Gunn, CFRE

Your AFP Suncoast Chapter was recently recognized for two notable achievements: the 2012 Friends of Diversity Award and the Ten Star Chapter Award. But, what do these designations really mean? 

The Ten Star Award is presented to Chapters that are positioned for future organizational growth and success. Observing National Philanthropy Day, promoting Ethics education and CFRE certification and providing networking opportunities are some of the ways we have increased professionalism within fundraising and public awareness of philanthropy. We appreciate Secretary Beth Fontes for ensuring we meet criteria throughout the year.

The Friends of Diversity Award means we have a designated plan and budget for diversity that has been sanctioned by our International Association. With it, we perform specific activities designed to increase diversity within fundraising  like offering programs on Women in Philanthropy; we educate our members on the importance of philanthropy in all cultures, like sharing diversity essays; We help unite fundraisers with diverse backgrounds with our collegiate and mentoring programs. Special thanks to Vic Teschel, Diversity Chair, for leading our efforts.

When you see these logos of achievement, you can be assured that we are driven to foster the best possible fundraising environment and that we are committed to a respectful and welcoming organization that is open to all. Your AFP Suncoast Chapter will be recognized at AFP’s International Conference on Fundraising in April. We hope to see you there and celebrate with you!

Nora Gunn, CFRE
2013 AFP Suncoast President
Director of Development, St. Joseph’s Hospital Foundation
Phone: 813 872 0979

An Interesting Time For AFP

February 4, 2013
Nora Gunn, CFRE

Nora Gunn, CFRE

by AFP Suncoast Chapter President, Nora Gunn

It’s an interesting time in the history of the Association Fundraising Professionals.

Not-for-profits are becoming major economic force, ranking third in the number of employed workers behind retail and manufacturing industries, long considered to be the engines of economic growth. The charitable world is growing progressively complex, with a diverse set of challenges.

Advocacy is becoming increasingly important. Your Association was instrumental in sparing the charitable deduction from falling off the fiscal cliff during the recent tax reform and deficit reduction negotiations. While AFP remains vigilant regarding legislative that could potentially impact our profession, it is only through the might of our members that we can safeguard the continuing vitality of philanthropy.

Here in the Suncoast Chapter, We represent nearly 250 members in a diverse array of fields and specialties. Nearly 20 percent of our members hold CFRE certifications, one of the highest in the Association. Our Chapter trends above the national average in growth and retention nationally and compared to chapters our size. As larger percentages of new fundraisers enter the field, it is our obligation to provide training which advances ethical and effective fundraising.

Surveys show we are meeting your needs, but we are never content to rest on our laurels. You have told us you:

  • Appreciate the friendships made and kept over the years
  • Found a position or hired from our Job Bank
  • Access AFP’s professional learning sources and seek advice from colleagues
  • Value the “professionalizing” of fundraising
  • Enjoy having a local connection
  • Like to keep in touch with trends; adopt a broader perspective
  • Learn about ethics and best practices

Since being involved in the leadership of our organization, I’ve gained an even greater appreciation for our volunteer-run Chapter.  Your leadership cares about your experience and the mission of our organization. Both internationally and locally, we are working diligently to serve the interests and livelihood of our members and the philanthropic community.

Please reach out to us if you have a question or suggestion about your involvement.

Nora Gunn, CFRE
2013 AFP Suncoast President
Director of Development, St. Joseph’s Hospital Foundation
Phone:(813)872-0979